Coop Dreams Season 3 plus Bonus Episodes on Video-On-Demand Site!

Coop Dreams Season 3 plus Bonus Episodes on Video-On-Demand Site!

That’s right! If you’ve been following Brad and his crew at Coop Dreams, you can catch up on any episode you missed starting tomorrow for the next 3 weeks! Coop Dreams will have all of season 3 episodes available on VOD for rental or download beginning Friday September 9th at 8:30 am ET. Three bonus episodes will be released one at a time for viewing for the next three weeks from 8:30 am ET Friday to 8:30 am ET Monday. Here is the schedule below: Coop Dreams Episode 11 — Bonus Episode FREE:   8:30 am ET Friday Sept 9 until 8:30 am ET  Monday Sept 11 Coop Dreams Episode 12 — Bonus Episode FREE:  8:30 am ET Friday Sept 15 until 8:30 am ET Monday Sept 18 Coop Dreams Episode 13 — Bonus Episode FREE:  8:30 am ET Friday Sept 22 until 8:30 am ET Monday Sept 25 Coop Dreams Season 3:  Available on VOD site for rental or download beginning Friday Sept 9 at 8:30 am ET Coop Coop Dreams Seasons 1 and 2:  Available on VOD site now Link to VOD site: http://www.fadedjeans.tv/videos-on-demand.html SEASON 3 DEBUTS ON SYNDICATION PARTNERS NEXT WEEK!   Starting Monday of next week, Coop Dreams syndication partners will switch programming from Seasons 1 and 2 of Coop Dreams to Season 3.  Here’s where to watch: Dish Network Angel Two Channel 266 Monday 9:30 pm Thursday 9:30 pm DirecTV UpLifTV Channel 379 Monday  6:00 pm Tuesday  4:00 pm Wednesday 9:30 am Saturday  3:30 am Tuff TV Local Channels Nationwide and Online Monday 12:00 pm Wednesday 12:00 pm Biz TV Local Channels Nationwide and Online Saturday...
Why Should I Feed New Country Organics?

Why Should I Feed New Country Organics?

We get a lot of questions about why our feed is special and what sets us apart from other companies. Our feeds are minimally processed, loose grain mashes with only the best ingredients. We don’t use least cost formulations and we only source North American, Certified Organic grains. Quality organic products are greatly important to New Country Organics and we are committed to helping grow and develop organics right here in this nation. We want to live where the organic products we use are being grown and developed right here. We want to develop organics at home, not import it from unknown and questionable sources. This is why we are committed to supporting our local farmers and providing fresh, wholesome feeds that are fully balanced to meet your animals’ needs. We believe the quality of our products speak for themselves and are thrilled to share Ms. Carroll’s personal experience with our feeds.   “I used to feed a local, conventional feed to my hens. The eggs tasted awful and I wouldn’t even eat them myself. The eggs were pale yellow with runny yolks, watery egg whites, and thin eggshells. I switched to New Country Organics Certified Organic Poultry Layer feed and in just 2 weeks, the eggs changed to bright, stand up yolks with a firm albumen (egg white), hard eggshells, and an incredible taste. I went from not eating the eggs to eating 3 a day.”   Thanks for sharing your experience, Ms. Carroll! We are so glad your birds are doing well.   If you would like to share your experience with us or have any questions...
Why Organic Grains Are Important Locally

Why Organic Grains Are Important Locally

Buying local is not just a trend or fad in the consumer world. Several studies by various universities* have revealed a multitude of reasons why supporting local farms and businesses are beneficial to communities. Here is a brief summary of the top three findings: 1) Local products support local people and build community. While there are certainly some local farmers who contract for large agricultural companies, a lot of them are independent producers striving to hold their own in a competitive market. Contract farmers receive a low percentage of the total profit from their products, thus making it hard to sustain their own farm and family needs. By buying local, farmers receive the full retail price for their products, thus helping them stay in business. 2) Buying local creates and sustains more jobs. Independently owned and operated businesses created approximately 2 million of the private-sector j0bs generated in 2014.** Buying local maintains job stability and keeps money recirculating within the community, as many local businesses also buy from and support other local businesses. 3) Buying local helps sustain diversity of product. Independent farmers have the freedom to pursue heirloom varieties of crops, heritage breeds of livestock, and to create their own unique mark on local markets. Additionally, there is no fear of breaching seed patent laws. Independent farmers have the freedom to save seeds from their best crops, which improves plant hardiness to local microclimates and soil types and helps to preserve heirloom varieties. This is far different from farmers who contract with large agricultural companies, as they are typically required to grow a select variety of products selected for shelf-life and ability to sustain large-scale harvesting...
What Should I Feed My Pet Pig?

What Should I Feed My Pet Pig?

Proper nutrition is crucial for the health of mini and potbelly pigs. For those following organic diets for themselves and all their critters, it is especially hard to find organic mini pig feed in the mainstream market. Thankfully, New Country Organics isn’t mainstream and doesn’t follow mainstream nutrition. We formulate our organic swine feeds with only the best, wholesome ingredients because we believe health starts in the gut. Our Certified Organic Swine feeds are fully formulated to meet the nutritional needs of pet pigs as well as production pigs, but can still be fed in conjunction with fresh vegetables and treats. The American Mini Pig Association has a great list of produce appropriate for your pig’s diet. Mini pigs and potbellies should be fed 2 to 3 times per day but not to exceed 1 to 2% of their total body weight. New Country Organics 16% Swine feed is appropriate for young, growing pigs while our 12% Swine feed is appropriate for general maintenance diets. Both feeds have a complete vitamin and mineral component as well as probiotics to provide optimal nutrition to meet your pig’s needs. Fresh water should be made available at all times, as water is critical for digestion as well as for all of the body’s many functions. If you have specific questions about your nutrition program for your pig, please contact Jillian at 540-469-0694 or by email at Jillian@NewCountryOrganics.com. Amy is one of our valued customers and shares her experience with our feeds below: Hi, my name is Amy and I have a 2-year-old Mini Potbelly Pig named Piggy. All my pets eat an all natural, organic diet,...
Coming Up: Coop Dreams Season 3!

Coming Up: Coop Dreams Season 3!

Season 3 of Coop Dreams is just around the corner! We are so excited to see what Brad and his crew have been up to this year. Episode 1 debuts Friday, June 30th at 8:30 am EST on Discovery Networks’ Destination America channel. Here’s a handy channel guide for your reference: Bright House/Spectrum     Channel 149/HD11 Comcast/XFINITY              Channel 113/HD1292 DirecTV                                 Channel 286/HD 286 DISH                                      Channel 194/HD9457 You may also use the Destination America Channel Finder at the following link to look up channels by provider and by zip code: http://www.destinationamerica.com/channel-finder/ Seasons 1 and 2 of Coop Dreams will also be available for 24 hours on Coop Dreams’ Video On Demand Site on Sunday, June 25th for free! This will allow any viewers to catch up on any episodes they may have missed prior to the start of Season 3. These episodes can also be viewed on the following TV schedules: DISH Network: AngelTwo Channel 266 Monday 9:30 pm ET Thursday 11:30 pm ET DirecTV UpLifTV Channel 379 Monday 6:00 pm ET Tuesday 4:00 pm ET Wednesday 9:30 am ET Saturday 3:30 am ET TuffTV Local Channels Nationwide and Online Monday 12:00 pm ET Wednesday 12:00 pm ET BizTV Local Channels Nationwide and Online Saturday 2 pm...
What Feed Should I Give My Ducks? Part 3

What Feed Should I Give My Ducks? Part 3

Every animal goes through different growth phases. For egg-laying ducks, there are three main phases: duckling, immature adult, and layer. Meat breeds would focus on the first two phases. We stress the importance of feeding the right feed at the right time. In this 3 part series, we discuss the differences between our NCO Duck Starter, Duck Grower, and Duck Layer feeds. Duck Layer Now that your birds are nearing 20 weeks of age or have just begun laying, it is time to transition them to Duck Layer. This feed is formulated with vitamins, minerals, and quality grains to support egg production and adult nutritional needs and should be offered free choice. Similar to the Duck Starter and Duck Grower, Duck Layer is also formulated with higher niacin than standard poultry feeds to prevent conditions such as angel wing from occurring. During molt, increasing the protein content in the diet can help ducks replenish their body reserves more quickly and help with feather production, as feathers are approximately 90% protein. Layers can be switched to Duck Grower during molt or given treats like Grubblies, which is dried black soldier fly larvae that has 35% protein and 25% fat. Increasing access to forage is also recommended for all life stages. While not necessary for production, ducks do enjoy water and it is recommended to keep shallow pools nearby for their use. Fresh drinking water should always be made available, as it helps move food down the digestive system and clean beak vents. If you have any questions about duck care, please contact our Sales Team at 540-469-0694 for...
What Feed Should I Give My Ducks? Part 2

What Feed Should I Give My Ducks? Part 2

Every animal goes through different growth phases. For egg-laying ducks, there are three main phases: duckling, immature adult, and layer. Meat breeds would focus on the first two phases. We stress the importance of feeding the right feed at the right time. In this 3 part series, we discuss the differences between our NCO Duck Starter, Duck Grower, and Duck Layer feeds. Duck Grower After the first 2 to 3 weeks of life, ducklings are ready for a chunkier feed. This change helps to continue to develop their crop and digestive tract. Duck Grower is 19% protein, which is 2% lower protein than the Duck Starter feed. At this age, the lower protein feed aids in a slower growth for better-controlled weight and structural development. This also allows the reproductive system to develop properly. The protein level is still high enough, however, to meet feather production needs. Duck Grower is also formulated with higher niacin than our Poultry Grower/Broiler feed and should be fed after 2 to 3 weeks of age until desired slaughter weight or until egg-laying age. Niacin is crucial for proper waterfowl development in all stages of growth, specifically for wing and leg development. After 4 weeks of age, ducks can be introduced to water sources. While not necessary for their development, ducks do enjoy water and it is recommended to keep shallow pools nearby for their use. Fresh drinking water should always be made available, as it helps move food down the digestive system and clean beak vents. Tune in tomorrow to learn more about NCO Duck Layer Feed! For immediate assistance, please contact our...
What Feed Should I Give My Ducks? Part 1

What Feed Should I Give My Ducks? Part 1

Every animal goes through different growth phases. For egg-laying ducks, there are three main phases: duckling, immature adult, and layer. Meat breeds would focus on the first two phases. We stress the importance of feeding the right feed at the right time. In this 3 part series, we discuss the differences between our NCO Duck Starter, Duck Grower, and Duck Layer feeds. Duck Starter   When ducklings hatch, their first instinct is to find food and water, as they expend a lot of energy breaking out of their shells. Water is extremely important for ducklings, as it helps move food down the digestive system and clean beak vents. Starter formulations are a much finer grind or crumble than other types of feed, as ducklings are small and their digestive systems are still developing. Smaller ground feed prevents blockage from occurring within the crop or other parts of the digestive tract and ensures better breakdown and absorption of nutrients. Ducklings require a higher protein diet for the first 2 to 3 weeks of life. A 21% protein diet is generally recommended to accommodate ducklings’ accelerated growth and energy needs. At this age, ducklings do not need the mineral allowances that layers need. Switching ducklings to layer feed during their critical growth stage can cause developmental problems in their legs, reproductive organs, and other parts of growth. However, niacin is crucial for proper waterfowl development in all stages of growth, specifically for wing and leg development. For this reason, it is recommended to feed a Starter formulation specific for ducklings or young waterfowl, as most other poultry feeds do not have...

Copper Deficiency in Goats

Red blood cell formation, hair pigmentation, connective tissue, enzymes, immune system function, the central nervous system, and bone growth all have one factor in common: these processes need copper to function properly. Copper deficiency, which once predominantly affected the East coast, has become increasingly widespread across the United States. Deficiency symptoms in goats manifest in a variety of ways: anemia, dull and rough hair coat, diarrhea, weight loss, atrophied muscles, bleaching color changes in hair coat, and fishtail to name a few. Young stock can also experience incoordination and paralysis of muscles, grinding of teeth, become swaybacked, or develop hypoglycemia. Copper deficiency is often misdiagnosed as other disorders such as CAE, listeriosis, or muscular dystrophy. If not corrected, this condition can be fatal.   Factors leading to copper deficiency are numerous and can be caused by secondary factors called copper antagonists. An abundance of various types of metal, sulfates, or molybdenum can block copper from absorption by a plant or an animal. These imbalances often occur in water sources as well as forages. The best practice to avoid copper deficiency is to provide a well-balanced, free choice mineral that is formulated with a higher copper level. This allows the animal to self-regulate according to their individual needs.   While studies are still ongoing to determine the best copper level for goats, numerous studies have been published indicating that 1500 ppm is too low for most goats in the US. One study published in the 2000 edition Sheep & Goat Journal tested goats on copper levels as high as 9000 ppm without causing copper toxicity (Luginbuhl, et al). After much...
GMO? Or Non-GMO? That is the question!

GMO? Or Non-GMO? That is the question!

Consumers are continuously perplexed by the terminology used within agriculture. Seed selection, plant breeding, and hybridization, for example, are often confused with genetic engineering (often referred to as GMO). Genetic engineering vastly differs from these other practices, as it utilizes a gene splicing technique to insert foreign genetic material into another organism’s DNA. This type of modification cannot occur on its own in nature. In contrast, seed selection, breeding, and hybridization are interrelated practices that can occur naturally and have been used in agriculture for centuries. Seed selection is a tedious but beneficial process done by farmers throughout all of history. Throughout each season, crops are monitored for productivity, disease and pest resistance, adaptability to surrounding environment, length of maturity, and overall viability of product. At the end of the season, the crops with the best traits are selected and seeds are saved for consecutive growing seasons. This practice has not only improved crop quality and yield over time, but also has adapted seeds to the local microclimates and soil types in which the crops were grown. (Bass et al., 2). Similarly, plant breeding is the “genetic improvement of crop plants through the study and application of genetics, statistics, agronomy, plant pathology, entomology, and related sciences” (“Plant Breeding,” Department of Agronomy, 1). This practice can be compared to creating a new dog breed or breed of livestock. The results are not always precise, but genetic changes do happen. These changes can be reasonably controlled through repeated breeding and careful selection, often leading to improved productivity over the parent cross. Selection is simply based off of a desired phenotype[1] and...