New Country Organics: A Message from CEO Jim Campbell

New Country Organics: A Message from CEO Jim Campbell

By now, some of you will have heard our news: New Country Organics is expanding to Texas and the southwest. While there is certainly a business case for our expansion (more on that below), as a company we are dedicated to being an active part of creating new – and supporting existing – organic economies. Not only do we work to create more organic acreage, we participate in and help nurture emerging, vital, socially responsible economies based on the development, use, integration and expansion of organics. Now over the years, I’ve been blessed by a rewarding career working for large and successful companies. I’ve had the chance to work on projects all over the world and during some of the most exciting and challenging times of the past few decades – from the collapse of communism to recovery from the Great Recession. Despite all this, there is no place I’d rather be, right now, than bringing our small firm, New Country Organics to America’s southwest, with our recently announced acquisition of the assets of Economy Mills in Lubbock Texas. You can read more about it at www.newcountryorganics.com/lubbock.  

 Most senior professionals are lucky enough to find meaning in their work that goes beyond the proverbial pay check, as it takes a huge amount of personal commitment, focus and abundant energy to be a success in those kinds of large corporate roles. And yet, how many of us can truly find meaning in what we do?  How many of us are nervous about giving up the big corporate role and trying something very different? I left financial services in 2014, and...
Building Better Soil

Building Better Soil

By Jillian Lowery, New Country Organics Farm and Garden Consultant. Luscious, abundant gardens such as the ones featured on Better Homes and Garden magazines are every gardener’s dream. Yet such beautiful success is not always a reality. A far more common reality is a garden that thrives for a few weeks only to end with struggling crops, lower yields, and an exasperated gardener. Successful gardens can be achieved, however, with closer attention and care of the soil. Healthy, productive soil makes for healthy, productive crops. In order to establish and maintain healthy soil, one must first understand the complex components with which it is created. Soil contains a vast, interconnected food web of microorganisms, earthworms, and other symbiotic elements. Plants contain mycorrhizal fungi, which are “the intricate associations roots form with specific fungal groups [that] represent the underground absorbing organs of most plants in nature” (Gianinazzi-Pearson, 1). These filaments interact with plant roots and surrounding bacteria to provide nutrients to the soil and to create a looser soil structure (Howard, 1). The carbohydrates released by the plants into the soil provide a nutrient-rich environment for the microorganisms teeming at the roots. Healthy topsoil can contain “600 to 800 million individual bacteria from a possible 10,000 species; several miles of fungal hyphae; 10,000 individual protozoa; and 20 to 30 beneficial nematodes from a possible 100 species” in just a spoonful of soil (Ussery, “Build Better Garden Soil,” 1). This complex ecology can be easily damaged, however, by poor soil structure or an imbalance of nutrients. In its basic elements, soil can be characterized as three distinct soil separates: sand, silt,...
Jillian Lowery, New Country Organics Farm and Garden Consultant, Educator

Jillian Lowery, New Country Organics Farm and Garden Consultant, Educator

Jillian spent the day teaching at Creative Works Farm, yesterday, and she made the news. Way to go Jillian! Here is a link to the story: http://www.newsleader.com/story/news/local/2015/10/11/education-and-fun-at-the-center-of-farm-event/73785626/ The New Country Organics booth:  Teaching kids about DNA:  Jillian’s lesson: “This is an old photo from the last time I did the DNA craft. Every kid that walked up was asked to explain DNA in their own words. We then discussed that it’s our “genetic blueprint,” the material that makes us “uniquely us.” There are 3.2 billion base pairs in the human body (also explained that A always binds with T, C with G, etc.) and these base pairs code for amino acids which code for different proteins (hair, skin, etc.). We share 50% of our DNA with bananas and 98% with chimpanzees. All living things have DNA, including strawberries, plants, etc. The structure of DNA is important because the double helix allows the DNA to compress and pack more information into smaller space and increases base pair interaction. The kids loved it and I had several older kids come back with younger kids and *they* taught the lesson :)” ​ If you have a question about using our products in your organic farm or garden, please give Jillian a call, she knows her stuff....