The Soup!

The Soup!

We made E! Online’s The Soup! Now that backyard flock tending is entering the mainstream, please help us press the urgency of doing it organically. Together we can convert more acreage to organic. And take the food chain back one delicious, healthy, ecologically good egg at a time. Thank you for supporting organics. Way to go Coop Dreams! Watch the Soup clip,...
2015 DECLARED INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF THE SOIL

2015 DECLARED INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF THE SOIL

2015 has been declared the International Year of Soils,1 and few topics could be more important at this time. One of the objectives of the International Year of Soils is to “create full awareness of civil society and decision makers about the fundamental roles of soils for human’s life.” Another is to “achieve full recognition of the prominent contributions of soils to food security [and] climate changeadaptation.” Rarely do you hear climate activists2 address the issue of soil and land regeneration, yet it is perhaps the most comprehensive solution to everyone’s concerns. Fighting over whether or not climate change is real; or whether climate change is manmade or not is completely irrelevant. Arguing over whether the temperature is actually rising or falling, or whether arctic ice sheets are shrinking or growing is a waste of time. Why Agricultural ‘U-Turn’ Is Necessary The fact of the matter is, the global landscape is changing, and food security is no longer a given, even if you have plenty of available land, and here’s why: Water scarcity is getting worse as aquifers are drained faster than they can be refilled. In August 2014, the National Geographic3reported that a four-year long drought in California had led to the depletion of snowpacks, rivers, and lakes. As a result, the state has been tapping into its underground aquifers to make up for the lack of water. At present, nearly 60 percent of California’s water needs are met by groundwater4 that does not have time to recharge at the same rate it’s being used. Soil erosion and degradation is rapidly getting worse. Air and water pollution are...
FARM BILL: TIME FOR AN OVERHAUL WITH INNOVATIVE FARMING SYSTEM

FARM BILL: TIME FOR AN OVERHAUL WITH INNOVATIVE FARMING SYSTEM

That’s the message conveyed in a recent policy paper featured in “Science” magazine. The authors of the paper, entitled “Transforming U.S. Agriculture,” argue that although U.S. farms have significantly increased their production yields in recent years, the environment and public health has been sacrificed. In an interview with The Huffington Post, the lead author, Washington State University professor John Reganold said, “If mainstream, conventional farming systems were sustainable, then we would not have overdrawn aquifers, eroded and degraded soils and polluted surface and ground waters.” “We also have concerns with farm labor working conditions and animal welfare,” Reganold added. With those concerns in mind, some farms have striven to innovate, cultivating practices such as organic farming, conservation agriculture and grass-fed and other alternative livestock production. Some of these practices aren’t abstract or new, of course, none are yet widespread. While a 2010 report by the U.S. National Research Council proposes both incremental and transformative methods to improve agriculture sustainability, the “Science” piece argues that ambitious approaches and systemic changes must be the primary focus, not just crop rotations and reduced tillage. The most pressing change must be achieved on the policy level. That change can be found in the 2012 Farm Bill, the federal government’s primary agricultural and food policy tool. “Most elements of the Farm Bill were not designed to promote sustainability,” the “Science” report read. Subsidies have made our food system too dependent on a few grain crops, such as corn and soybeans, which are ultimately used for over-processed food and animal feed. Such an industrial food system damages the environment, and it also damages human health....
HELP SAVE A WORKING HERITAGE FAMILY FARM

HELP SAVE A WORKING HERITAGE FAMILY FARM

Raising a Down Payment to Save a Farm, Endangered Livestock, and Sustainable Practices from Government Favoritism, and Corporate Greed. This excellent video is a must see to renew your faith in the family farm and next generation of organic farmers dedicated to returning to the way things were. Until you hear enough and realize that the system is rigged against the little guy, and even when doing the right thing there appears to be little hope that we have a system that can help keep the family farm alive. The regulatory costs/fees associated with running a clean farm while remaining compliant raises questions about how our farming laws are made and in whose interests they serve. Listen to Neil Perrin of Arcadian Acres, a family farm outside Athen, OH since 1838. He is a superb writer/narrator and if you aren’t moved by the end to want real change, then you must not have been listening....
RAW MILK IN VA. MORE ILLEGAL THAN ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, OR FIREARMS

RAW MILK IN VA. MORE ILLEGAL THAN ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, OR FIREARMS

Restrictive regulation in Virginia has rendered raw milk with more over-sight than the alcohol, tobacco or firearms. The same goes for homemade pumpkin or sweet potato or pecan pies made on the farm and sold on-premise. Without a name and address on a label, and disclosure statement as well as a visit from a government agent, local farmers, chefs and cooks are unable to sell their homemade goodness. See how the VA Food Freedom Act intends to change the law and help restore common sense to the food chain....